Observation on the Street | Jonathan Higbee

The power of observation is the single greatest skill to successful street photography according to Higbee.
© Jonathan Higbee

Jonathan Higbee is a street photographer who has some wise words for beginners and amateurs who are making their attempt at shooting the streets. Higbee’s work is reminiscent of Joel Meyerowitz and Alex Webb, two giants of this genre.

Higbee was recently interviewed by Lensculture and here are a few highlights from Higbee’s responses:

“In my opinion, the single biggest skill necessary to make strong street photography is the power of observation. If one learns how to truly be present in the moment (and take themselves out of it) step back and observe life, they can then tap into a special quality of the moment that so few have access to. This is the nature and appeal of voyeurism.”

© Jonathan Higbee
© Jonathan Higbee
© Jonathan Higbee

“Ethics in art is a difficult topic to discuss as there are a million different opinions. Yet I think this diversity of views, even when they conflict, of what art should and shouldn’t do is one of its biggest strengths and sources of power. The idea that one photographer’s personal set of principles should be forced upon every other photographer (and every situation) is bullshit.”

“Street photography should reject rules or any adherence to dogma. I think the most interesting work being produced in the street genre does that well.”

© Jonathan Higbee
© Jonathan Higbee

“Most of us can work on our ability to handle constructive criticism, myself included. But if a critic has an oversized angry and vocal reaction to your work, I’d take it as a sign that you’re onto something worth exploring more, that you’ve tapped into an idea that provokes others in such a primal way. Dig in deeper.”

Read the full article at: www.lensculture.com