The best thing from 2017: Photobooks!

Photobooks, Photobooks, Photobooks!!

This year has brought many surreal moments and most of us are ready to say goodbye to 2017, but we must not overlook the greatest gift of 2017: Photobooks!

 

Photography books are becoming more appreciated as the days of magazines are dwindling and people yearn for quality prints. Photobooks allow more creativity to the photographer and are a refreshing break from looking at photos on a screen. The message: go forth and find great works by emerging photographers!

 

If you’re finishing up last minute shopping and can’t figure out what to buy your complicated girlfriend, consider the following list of a few of this year’s best photobooks. Lensculture found 75 photo experts to indulge the world in what books best represent the times in which we live. We’ve selected our top five.

© Sanne de Wilde
  1. The Island of the Colorblind by Sanne de Wilde

“This is a work of documentary photography that feels fictional and mythological”—a potent combination. De Wilde’s images create a portal—not only to a distant place we’ll likely never visit, but also to a way of seeing that many of us can only imagine.” Azu Nwagbogu

© Feng Li
  1. White Night by Feng Li

“Finding the most surreal moments in daily life, Li manages to make the world a very sinister and dark place, yet embraces it with his distinctive visual wit and cunning. I have been a fan of this truly original Chinese photographer for many years, but only now does he finally put his work into book form.” Martin Parr

© John Chiara
  1. California by John Chiara

“The book immerses one immediately in warm, yellow California light with a gradient of lightening, sunshine-toned end papers. The printing is luscious, and the sequencing transports the viewer from south to north throughout the pages. Sometimes slightly bleak (drought-brown hillsides tell tales of past and future wildfires), sometimes magical (in-camera techniques that morph and bend colors), and always with a very specific attention to the quality of light that hints at the ghosts of California history…” Alyssa Coppelman

© Mathieu Asselin
  1. Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation by Matthieu Asselin

“Through portraits, landscape and still-life photos, plus archive materials (documents, objects, videos, testimonials, articles), Asselin has conducted a rigorous, multi-level investigation that conveys Monsanto’s story. The book clearly shows the facts, with no ambivalence.”  Alessandra Capodacqua

© Jonas Bendiksen
  1. The Last Testament by Jonas Bendiksen

“Bendiksen takes the viewer on a global, spiritual quest…while portraying himself as a photographic apostle, asking why the Biblical prophecy of the Second Coming has remained so potent thousands of years on.” Alona Pardo

 

 

 

Read the full article at: www.lensculture.com