Lua Ribeira Explores her Puritanical Reactions

Keep your eyes out for the work of Lua Ribeira
From ‘Noises in the Blood’ © Lua Ribeira

Success is no stranger to Lua Ribeira. Before she graduated photo school, she was the recipient of the Firecracker Grant in 2015 and her work was also selected by Magnum photographer Susan Meiselas to appear in Raw View magazine’sWomen Looking at Women issue. She also has commercial clients to the likes of Carla Lopez and has shot editorials for Wired. Not to mention, her photos have been shown at international festivals. Last year she graduated from the University of South Wales where she focused on documentary photography, and has hit the photo scene with gut-hitting imagery.

In her series Noises in the Blood, Ribeira investigates Jamaican dancehall culture. While wrestling with her discomfort to her own reaction to the sexually explicit lyrics associated with this musical genre, Rebeira captures her love for the dance culture surrounding this music. Rebeira describes to British Journal of Photography her quest into finding out why she had such a reaction to the sexual nature of dancehall, “That feeling bothered me.

I did not fully understand it. Where was that puritanism coming from? But, of course, it was coming from a Judeo-Christian background, which is not particular to me but to the European context. Women in the dancehall very often seem to be in control of their sexuality and make gestures and moves that will make many people blush. Their behaviour within the dancehall does not match the Western understanding of femininity.” Lua Ribeira was a hit at this year’s Les Rencontre d’Arles and we look forward to her future work.

From ‘Noises in the Blood’ © Lua Ribeira
From ‘Noises in the Blood’ © Lua Ribeira

Read the full article at: www.bjp-online.com